How to create a clean water alley, Part 5

While the concrete cured, the crew focused on several elements as illustrated in the following photographs

Refining grade elevations for the bio-swale.
Refining grade elevations for the bio-swale.
Prepping the wall for paint.
Using a roller prevents overspray into adjacent properties
Using a roller prevents overspray into adjacent properties

At the end of November, rain was predicted, and with an incomplee bio-swale, the crew protected the project site from sediment carried in runoff. Construction was halted for several days.

Preparing for rain

Preparing for rain

Rain delayed construction

Rain delayed construction

The storm was an opportunity to see how run-off would flow through the bio-swale.

When it was dry enough to work, the crew focused on completing the forebay and the weir apron.

Placing cobble in the forebay.
Placing cobble in the forebay.
Cobble in forebay almost complete.
Cobble in forebay almost complete.

If you’ve ever wondered, bollards” are structural elements – often posts – that allow pedestrians access but block vehicles from entry. Bollards at the entries of the Paseo make it easier for pedestrians, strollers, and carts to acces the Paseo.

Placing the bollards
Placing the bollards
Making sure the bollard is level.
Making sure the bollard is level.

During the final days of construction, the crew installed the green screen, refined the eleveation points for the bio-swale, and planted more than 10,000 plants native to southern California.

A green screen provides a structure for native vines to grow and adds an element of interest to the length of the Paseo.

Installing the green screen.
Installing the green screen.
Final bio-swale elevation points.
Final bio-swale elevation points.
Placed, spaced, and ready for planting.
Native plants placed, spaced, and ready for planting.
Bio-swale planted…
…and mulched.

A resident appreciated the opportunity to test the “strollability” of the almost complete Paseo.

Testing the ‘strollability’.

The Paseo, ready for pedestrians and rain.

Paseo north entry

The Council for Watershed Health would like to express our appreciation to the residents adjacent to the Paseo and in the neighborhood for their patience with the various construction activities.

We also thank our project funders:

Urban Greening Proposition 84, Strategic Growth Councill, State of California

Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy

Proposition O, Bureau of Sanitation, City of Los Angeles

Department of Water & Power, City of Los Angeles

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